The Decade of our Country’s Decline. 


A seemingly inconsequential event took place March 13, 1963, and with the help from with the ACLU, our country began its slide into discord, division and indifference.

By Sarasota Patriots - S.E.


The Downhill Decade 1963 - 1973.


This writer grew up in the early 40’s through the birth of Rock & Roll in the mid 50’s. There was bullying but all seemed to survive. If we were lucky we got our drivers license at 16.  We also has family dinners at least on Sunday and we often worked and played outside. Many of us went to Church, left for a while during the 60’s but returned when the kids came along.


In early March of 1963, appropriately enough, Billboards no.1 song was "Walk Like a Man”, by those Jersey boys, The Four Seasons. Across the country in Arizona, Ernesto Miranda was arrested on March 13th in Arizona and charged with rape and kidnapping. He confessed was tried and convicted and sentenced 20 to 30 years, just three months later - efficient. That watershed event took place without notice outside of Arizona.


As it turned out, we all heard about it three years later, when the case came up for appeal. The US Supreme Court (Chief Justice Earl Warren presiding) over turned his conviction in 1966 with 5-4 majority. Why, because he wasn’t informed of his 5th amendment rights (of self incrimination) by the arresting officers. This was the first case on this basis of many to follow, and coined the terms Miranda rights - Aka being Mirandized.


The bottom line is: If you admit to the police you have committed the crime before they tell you you’re entitled to a Lawyer, you go free. Also part of the court system was the gift of a lawyer should you not be able to afford one.


And so it Begins.


In their own words, “Once again, the ACLU was at the front lines of the battle.” ACLU Arizona attorneys represented defendant Ernesto Arturo Miranda” . That Miranda decision is still fresh in my mind. I was post adolescence and had voted in my first election just 2 years prior to the SCOTUS decision. I just couldn’t understand it.


I grew up respecting the law, order, and the cop on the beat. Over the years I couldn’t understand why didn’t they just teach “Miranda rights” in school instead of having a cop recite those famous lines every time, in effect putting a constraint at a crucial time in a crime.  In fact why not teach that the first day of each school year, in grades seven through twelve. Make it part of citizenship. Would that be too much to ask? 


This change of law unwittingly did more harm than good by uprooting respect for the Law & police while increasing apprehension, uneasiness and anxiety with apprehended criminals. I considered it the precipitous event unleashing the ACLU’s liberalism that has sent our country down a darkened path.


In 1961, President John Kennedy had issued executive order, which created the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity and mandated that federally funded projects take "affirmative action" to insure that hiring and employment practices were free of racial bias.


Shortly their after, came the Great Society, AKA the Civil Rights act of 1964 which was  a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democrat President Lyndon B. Johnson. The main goal was the elimination of poverty and racial injustice. New major spending programs that addressed education, medical care, urban problems, rural poverty, and transportation were launched during this period. Under its guise, universities began one by one, implimating affirmative action policy for admission.


During this period we read that “God is Dead”. This was brought about by an incident of 1963. Steven I. Engel, a Jew, was upset to see his son’s hands clasped and his head bent in prayer. He told his son that this was “not the way we say prayers.” Engel, a founding member of the ACLU, and others brought action along with parents of children in the Long Island, New York public school system, arguing that it constituted the state-sponsored establishment of religion in violation of citizens’ First Amendment rights via the Fourteenth Amendment. 


"Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence on 

Thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, 

our parents, our teachers, and our Country."


Use of the Regent's prayer (a generic prayer composed by the New York State Board of Regents) was initially upheld in both New York State Court and in the New York Court of Appeals, prompting Engels to petition the US Supreme Court in the Engel v. Vitale case in 1962. With its 8–1 vote to make public recitation of the Regents' Prayer1 in public schools unlawful, the U.S. Supreme Court made its first-ever decision on prayer in public schools.  


We all know the rest of the story. Constant chiseling away of God in any form began starting with the Christmas creche and imagery. This went beyond Christmas to Include just about anything especially relating to the ten commandments and all brought by the ACLU. From school pageantry to changes in library books, it never ceased followed by the decline in morality.


About that time we witnessed the onset of the Vietnam war and the arrival of the Beatles. As a result a counterculture sprung up. They were long haired folks, first living in San Fransisco, that we’d come to call hippies- kids of the baby boomers. They begun a movement turned on with the help of the psychedelic drug, LSD (legal at first), championed by psychologist Timothy Leary.  The hippies dogma featured love, peace, sex, drugs and music as personified by the song  "San Francisco” (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair).


So far God was dead, respect for law declined, unearned gains were rewarded. All part of the behest of the ACLU the champion of the left. 


The nonviolent freedom of expression was generally tolerated, fact is it caught on fire with the help of the music industry, the British invasion, AKA The Beatles, Stones etc., Hollywood and theater. One must remember Hair, the B’way show then movie, it had a pragmatic theme of the hippie counterculture and sexual revolution of the late 60s, several of its songs became anthems of protest. Nothing evoked freedom more than those drug dealing pot smoking easy riders, Fonda, Hopper and Nicholson in the movie of the same name.


During those Hippie  “Free love” days,  The first oral contraceptive, Enovid, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as contraception. But believe it or not, birth control was prohibited by many states so it wasn’t until 1965 The Supreme Court (in Griswold v. Connecticut) gave married couples the right to use birth control! 


Hollywood naturally jumped on the band wagon in challenging the norms and taking advantage of the times with “X” rated movies such as, “I am Curious Yellow”, Hoffman’s Midnight Cowboy,  Stanley Kubrick’s Clockwork Orange, Brando’s Last Tango in Paris and even a porn cartoon Fritz the Cat. Hollywood didn’t like the rating system and X rated sounded too strong. It was changed to NC-17. Oh even TV was pushing the boundaries by producers like Norman Lear.


On a hot summer day in August 11 to 16, 1965 in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles from  when a Black  motorist on parole for robbery, was pulled over for reckless driving. A minor roadside argument broke out, and then escalated into a fight with police. False rumors spread that the police had hurt a pregnant woman, and six days of looting and arson followed. The LA police needed the support of nearly 4,000 members of the California National Guard to quell the riots, which resulted in 34 deaths and over $40 million in property damage. The riots were blamed principally on police racism.




1968 - 50 years ago,  American politics was turned upside down.


Massive civil disobedience and violent protests would become the new normal and cultural wars  broke out as well. Moral and social issues—God was forbidden in public places, abortion, affirmative action, busing, crime, drugs, feminism, gay rights—would tear apart families, communities and the entire nation. They still linger today, only more so.



H. Rap Brown & Stokely Carmichael

On the other side of the coin, due to the precipitous legislated social gains of black people, street thugs and hardened criminal begot new found courage with the help of Miranda and the ACLU.  They formed numerous black groups. Some would call them gangs like the Black Panthers founded in 1966 by Huey Newton & Bobby Seal. The first popular use of the term "Black Power" as a social and racial slogan was by Stokely Carmichael. By 1968, many Black Panther leaders had been arrested, including founder Huey Newton for the murder of a police officer and always to the rescue, was the ACLU. It was at that summers Olympics that two medal winning black athlete raised the Panther’s black-gloved fist, and kept them raised until the anthem had finished.



Bill Ayers, Bernardine Dohrn, Mark Rudd

Other groups simultaneously flared up inspired by the Vietnam War and draft. Many were hippies and college white groups head quartered at the Univ. of Mich. Such Names as the Weather Underground, Symbionese Liberation Army,  Bill Ayres, Mark Rudd, Tom Hayden group Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) etc.  Ironically, a student protest called the Free Speech Movement took place during 1964 & 1965 on the campus of Berkeley under the informal leadership of students Mario Savio, and others. Tell that to the Snowflakes today. 



Huey Newton and Bobby Seale

March 31, 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson appeared on national television and announced that he had decided not to seek his party’s nomination for president. Shortly afterwards, the two names that lead the Democrat  party’s for nomination were Jonson’s VP, Hubert Humphrey & Bobby Kennedy. Kennedy resuscitated the hopes for peaceful meaningful reform. His campaign, took him across the country where he  faced its decisive test in the June California primary which would decide whether he could win his party's nomination for president. Kennedy won the primary, and as he addressed the cheering crowd, a young Palestinian named Sirhan Sirhan shot Bobby from point-blank range. The next day Robert Kennedy died. 


Just weeks later saw an another explosion of racial outrage due to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. It brought smashed windows and tense confrontations between police and protesters in cities through out the country and in Washington DC within a few blocks of the White House. 



Jerry Rubin & Abby Hoffman

The Democrat convention was held in Chicago during this period of violence, political turbulence, and civil unrest. There were riots in more than 100 cities following the assassination of King.  The National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam and the Youth International Party (Yippies) had already begun planning a youth festival in Chicago to coincide with the Democratic National Convention, August 26th to 29th. They were not alone, as other groups such as Students for a Democratic Society would also make their presence known. 10,000 demonstrators gathered in Chicago for the convention, where they were met by 23,000  police and National Guardsmen. For an entire week, the protesters and the Chicago police skirmished, on national television, with the whole world watching.


Following the Hippies came the short lived  “Youth International Party”, AKA Yippies. Their leaders Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, became notorious for their slogans and theatrics,  became media favorites. Their stated intention to disrupt the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago in August with the notorious group known collectively as the "Chicago Seven”. (Hoffman,  Rubin, Dellinger, Hayden, Davis, Froines, and Weiner) All household names at the time, and all defended by the ACLU.


Weeks later, at NYC’s Columbia University, radical student Mark  Rudd (SDS) and other radicals occupied the administration building and seized the dean of the college. Eventually black students and neighborhood activists joined the protest, convincing the white students to leave the building and turn the demonstration over to them. 


The Columbia unrest unfolded at a time of continued growing student protest across the country — against the war in Vietnam, against restrictive campus policies, and against traditional curricula, courses and values. At Columbia, violent protests led to the cancellation of final exams and an early end to spring semester. The campus revolt also convinced many Americans that revolution was at hand — that young radicals had moved from mere protest toward power. They would seize control of "the machine," if it would not cease to pursue inhumane ends.


From Berkeley (CA)  it was on to Columbia (NY) with stops in between.


In the late 60’s  a New York radio station had a show called “Womankind”. It included invited members of a radical group known simply as “The Feminists”.  One of the participants made her impassioned plea for “Ms.”  instead of “Mrs.” or “Miss”. Her advocacy paid off. Just days before a national demonstration, Gloria Steinem registered her approval of it’s use, in her “City Politic” column in New York magazine. In some quarters, recognition of Ms. was slow in coming. The New York Times waited until  the 80’s. Many women were demanding, as the newly formed National Organization for Women (NOW) insisted, admittance to the rights and privileges of citizenship in truly equal partnership with men. These radical feminists burst onto the national scene in September 1968 with dramatic protests at the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City.


Till this point only one group hasn't been mentioned. Then during the summer of ’69 the year of Woodstock an less than a month before man was to step on the moon, we saw The Stonewall riots (also referred to as the Stonewall uprising or the Stonewall rebellion). They were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the Gay community against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village NY (I used to eat there).  It are widely considered to constitute The spark  leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBTQ rights as they call it today. Today we can choose our sex, sexual identity or none at all. Today Medicaid even pays a transexuals sex change operation while in jail or the millitary! It was the first time I heard of NAMBLA.


The student protests were still going on as of the spring of the 70’s  when the Ohio National Guard was called to Kent State University to put down a mass protest against the “Bombing of Cambodia” escalation of the Vietnam War. Things got out of hand  and the guardsmen  fired into the crowd killing four students and wounding nine others, some had been walking nearby or observing the protest from a distance. There was a significant national response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States due to a student strike nationally. The event further affected public opinion, during the  already socially contentious time.


This period of supposedly  “The New Openness”, in the late 60’s, saw a also resurgence of political activity, especially on the Civil Rights front. As a result the Communists Party began lending support to groups like CORE and NAACP. The ACLU always was and still is significantly staffed by Communists. This resurgence awoke the dormant Communist Party as time to break out of isolation. Loyalty Oaths required by government workers and university professors were being challenged. Groups like SDS (Students for a Democratic Society) saw the Communist Party as the “old guard”.             


Inspired the by the avalanche of the social legislation of the times, little heard of, Mrs. Patricia Nordman of DeLand, FL and A. S. Herlong, Jr. of  the Florida  House of Representatives [had it] read into US Congressional Record,  The Communist goals in the United States and plans for the times (1962). About three decades later, In 1992 a second communist strategy meeting (for the US) was held at the University of California - Berkeley, where else, for the sole purpose of updating their objectives originally proposed in the sixties.  You will be amazed at how many of their list of goals are taking or have taken place with the help of the ACLU. Yet the general attitude towards communists is “ You must be kidding”. Communism is dead. It hasn't been around since The Berlin Wall came down and  the Soviet Union collapsed. - WRONG.


Do you remember that the ACLU put a stop to all executions nationally? Yes, the ACLU  believes the death penalty inherently violates the constitutional ban against cruel and unusual punishment. In Furman v. Georgia  (1967) the Supreme Court forbad all executions in the United States until it was determined  that there was a degree of consistency in the application of the death penalty throughout the US.  Subsequently, a majority of states passed new death penalty statutes, the court then reaffirmed the legality of capital punishment in 1977. 


The Early 70’s - going downhill at a gallop. You can feel the momentum.


Another broadway show was launched. Jesus Christ Superstar as a 1970 rock opera with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Contemporary attitudes and sensibilities (as well as slang) pervade the lyrics, by Tim Rice. Harmless enough, just another subtle attack on religion.


An ACLU favorite;  It wasn’t until the early seventies came the infamous Norma McCorvey, under the name of Jane “Roe versus Wade”. The Supreme Court ruled 7–2 in favor of a woman’s right of aborting a fetus development (Abortion). the Irony here is Ms. McCorvey  regrets her part in being an ACLU puppet in the suit that would probably have come about in any case. Planned Parenthood’s primary goal is to help those women seeking help with the decision on getting an abortion. There  has been periodic tinkering with timing and circumstances but today an Abortion is legal at 6 months (25 weeks or 182 days) where it is more often that not a baby can survive with medical care. Ironically it is seldom mentioned the Planned Parenthood’s was founded by eugenicist Margaret  Sanger. 


Another ACLU favorite: was the rise of the American Indian Movement (AIM), a Native American activist organization founded to protect the rights of Native Nations and "ensure the fulfillment of treaties made with the United States." They too wanted to get into the action, so in the early 1970's the movement undertook several protests, including a 71-day armed standoff at Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota . It make headlines world wide.


Young people shunned long-accepted routes to social and professional success. They challenged the parietal rules that governed the personal behavior of students on campuses  - single-sex dorms, curfews, prohibitions against single women living off-campus.  More and more young people chose to "live together without benefit of matrimony". It was in 1970, the University of Kansas students initiated a plan for coed dorms. "I believe that segregation of the sexes is unnatural," one sophomore wrote in support of the new system.


Also in the early 70’s,  students at the University of Tennessee, fought and won the U.S. Supreme Court case known officially as Tennessee Valley Authority v. Hill. They used the federal Endangered Species Act and the snail darter, a little fish threatened with extinction, as legal leverage to stop the building of the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Tellico Dam. It took an act of congress to create a mechanism whereby a specific project could be excluded from the act -  the dam project was exempted from the Endangered Species Act and was eventually built. 


The women’s liberation movement also gained renewed energy and force in the late 1960s and early 1970s as women fought for equal pay, equal treatment, and new opportunities. They did so by demanding equal access for male dominated universities and workplaces and they created these in-roads through politics on all levels: local, state, and national.  Women, for the first time in United States history, were becoming doctors, lawyers, scientists, pilots…no occupation was off-limits.  Their influence and re-organization of traditional sexual roles and expectations upset many people who wanted a return to “traditional” values. Chivalry, mans instinct to flatter and protect women - gone.


Dishonorable mention must go to attorney William Kunstler, the face of the ACLU in those times. He was also about the ugliest Lawyer in NY. The New York Times, being polite,  labeled him as  “the country's most controversial lawyer”. He was known for his defense of the Chicago Seven,  Gregory Lee Johnson (right to burn an American flag), members of the Catonsville Nine, Black Panther Party, Weather Underground Organization, the Attica Prison rioters and such household names as H. Rap Brown, Stokely Carmichael, Angela Davis, Omar Abdel-Rahman ("the Blind Sheik”). He defended the miscreant in Central Park Jogger Case and El Sayyid Nosair  who shot the militant Rabbi Meir Kahane. Oh, he also defended an arsonist who burned down a Jewish Community Center, killing twelve, because he was not provided a lawyer before he signed a confession. Kunstler was called in by AIM at Wounded Knee, to preside over the protesters peaceful withdraw without risking arrest too. 


In 1971 after Legislation in both houses, the states ratified the 26th  amendment to the Constitution. (I might add, that is probably the last time anybody we’ll see that happen.) Lowering the Voting Age from 21 to 18. You gotta be kidding. This effectively allowed  the love children the parents of todays snowflakes to vote. About the same time they raised the drinking age in NY from 18 to 21. I  thought for sure the 18 year olds with the power to vote would reverse that, but it never happened. That tells me they were just not smart enough to organize. Where was Hoffman & Rubin when you need them? Maybe they just didn’t want to drink. It doesn’t make much difference today since now pot is becoming legal in many states …and they still can’t drink.


Regarding the ACLU,  I’m sure some will call this an Antisemitic remark for stating a fact that the ACLU is saturated with Jews. Just look at the names mentioned throughout  this article and behind the scenes of events using a google search. Remember the Jewish Population in the US is only about 6%. Now-a-days I am happy to see many Jews, most of them religious, on the conservative side of the tracks especially on talk shows, in broadcasting and editorial writing. I just wish they could point out to their secular brothers their evil ways, especially those who occupy media in all it’s forms.


The ACLU is no longer defending our “American Liberties” (as if they ever were), today they are aggressively trying to implement communism and bring down this country. Just the insignia/logo of the ACLU’s new Organization “Power to the People” is the communist fist although recently scaled back some what.


Where are we today?


The American establishment, “the best and the brightest,” had been broken on the wheel of Vietnam. Liberal elites would move to ally themselves with the antiwar left and to denounce as “Nixon’s war” the cause into which they themselves had led the country. 


Back in 68, the Democrat party left Chicago in turmoil. In re-grouping, the hard core democrats,  and hard working union folks were now joined by a liberal coalition of feminists, progressives, homosexuals, blacks, atheists, communists, and godless drug users, forming their bedrock for years to come. So we’ll sum things up with two great Prager Univ. videos and a Dennis Prager article. They are right on target and say it all with little dispute, but still there those that see the sky as pink. This single thing that bugs me most and says it all is the fact that in 1986 we saw the instituting of a new National Holiday for MLK but at the cost of eliminating all other holidays for individuals, namely  Washington & Lincoln combining then and other presidents into a “catch all” presidents day. The latter part designed to placate blacks by the feelgooders. It was not right. Have we no great white man in our history that is greater than King?


We’ll sum things up with two great Prager Univ. videos and one short essay by the man himself. They are so right on target and of little dispute, but still there those that see the sky as pink, or did I already say that..